Welcome Jenn Miranda to the Board!

We are pleased to announce the addition of another voice to our Board of Directors: Jenn Miranda. Jenn was inducted at our Q1 meeting in 2021 as a General Board Member.

Jenn is an amateur farmer, plant lover, and mental wealth enthusiast. As a mindfulness mentor and certified yoga/meditation instructor, Jenn is on a mission to help others enhance the quality of their lives. Her passion for sustainability not only of the health and happiness of others but also of the planet are her driving force for being part of Revive EcoVillage.

You can learn more about Jenn on her Instagram or Website.

The Board of Directors accept rolling applications and review them as they are received. Our minimum number of Directors is 3, and we have no maximum number. If you are interested in volunteering your time on the Board, please Contact Us or fill out our Online Application.

Meet Revive EcoVillage

The last year has been one of such growth for us! Our Board has grown, our purpose is renewed, and many big changes are coming: starting with our name.

The original name, The Landerholmstead, was dreamt up in a class at Bastyr University when I (Rebeccah) first started putting pen to paper regarding this unusual idea. I envisioned a self-sufficient farm with just my family, but the vision grew as I learned about permaculture and reflected on my deepest, sincerest wishes for our region. The marriage of a permaculture site and a charity tackling homelessness simply made sense. So I shared the idea, found support in those closest to me, and soon formed the Board of Directors.

Fast forward half a decade. As the business gained more support, I started to feel like the name was incongruent with our work… while catchy, straightforward, and of course a nod to my ancestors, the name was inherently ego-driven: one naming my family and making us seem like a central part of the organization. While I’ll always be the dreamer who came up with this plan, my hope for our organization is that we blossom into a force for positive change. We are not a private Foundation funded by my family; we are a state nonprofit (hopefully soon a federal one). Any focus on one individual or family isn’t consistent with what I want to help build.

While this idea milled around my head, I had a difficult but vital conversation with a number of Indigenous persons, where I learned that the word “homestead” itself can be harmful to them and their communities. The Homestead Act of 1862 gave stolen Indigenous land away to white farmers, and most of this land has never been returned to the communities that were forced off of it. This Act is just one example among many of atrocities towards Indigenous people associated with this word. That conversation sealed the deal for us – we needed a name change that would not trigger such harmful associations for Indigenous people.

The Board thoughtfully went through an evaluation process together where we considered dozens of options, variations, and phrases and how we perceived them individually or collectively. We settled on the name Revive EcoVillage, and we hope that it conveys the same sense of powerful hope to you as it did to us. Our name change must be filed with the state before it takes legal effect, and once we have that confirmation from the State of Washington you’ll be able to find it on our Public Documents page.

I’m proud to retire the name The Landerholmstead, which served us well in our beginning but no longer suits who we want to be. And as I alluded in the beginning of this post, this is just one of many major upheavals and announcements we’re excited to bring to the public in the coming months. Thank you for your support thus far and for continuing to join us on our journey!

Welcome Our New Board Member!

Our ever-expanding Board has grown once more, and we are proud to welcome Jordyne Perry as a General Board Member. Learn about the entire Board of Directors here.

Jordyne Perry (General BOARD Member)

Jordyne is a Washingtonian, born and raised. She has worked with children since she was a child herself and feels that children are our greatest treasures. She also believes in fighting for social justice and there is no better place to start than with our children. She has worked in childcare for the last 10 years as a nanny, para educator and preschool teacher. She spends her free time with family and friends and spends hours online looking for dogs to adopt and speaking up for BIPOC.

Jordyne was voted in to the Board during our Q4 meeting October 14, 2020, and she will be inducted at our Q1 meeting in 2021.

Welcome Jordyne!

Board Applications are accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis. Please Apply Online or Contact Us for more information

Juneteenth / Black Lives Matter / Our Commitment to Equity

On this Juneteenth, 2020, it feels especially important to write on our support of Black Lives Matter and the worldwide protests for racial equity. We are proud of our organization’s commitment to equity, but we simultaneously admit that we can always learn more and do better.

Here’s a quick snapshot of some things we are proud of:

  • One of our primary goals – Care of People. This means all people. Permaculture is most needed for the downtrodden. Our greatest impact will (hopefully) be on those who are most vulnerable.
  • Diversity of those we serve (people of color are disproportionately affected by homelessness)
  • Diversity of our leadership (including people of color, women, GLBTQ, and differently-abled)
  • Anti-Discrimination Declaration – this was created with our initial policies in 2016. It is a living document/work in progress that can always be improved, but it is foundational in our processes. When our policies are approved by the Board they will be published on our site: if you would like to read the Declaration in the meantime please Contact Us to receive a copy.
  • Indigenous leaders will be involved in our homestead development. Their history and representation will be woven into our design plans. We will pay “Real Rent” to the Duwamish people (assuming we are on Duwamish land) for the duration of our time on their land.

And here’s a snapshot of some ideas to help us better support our BIPOC community:

  • While our leadership is diverse, we can still improve. Roughly 70% of our Board identify as white, which is reflective of the demographic in Washington state (80% white). That being said, we can always diversify to strengthen and provide more perspectives. Indigenous representation in particular would be ideal and we will seek to expand in this direction.
  • The Board will discuss our support of Black Lives Matter at our Q2 meeting in July, with a focus on what more we can be doing. How can we further diversify? Should we create a committee to focus on this? Should we use consultants? 
  • I am committed to us finding a path for reparations within our policies. I do not know what this looks like yet, I just know that it is important and needed. The Board will weigh in on this and we will develop reparative justice policies as we continue to build our organizational framework. Reparations will be a part of our homestead from the start.

If you’re curious why (or concerned that) we haven’t spoken up specifically about Black Lives Matter before this moment, I will admit that I needed time – as a non-black person who is President of the Board – to find the right words. If you know me personally, you know I speak without abandon on my personal social media accounts, but speaking up on a business account is different. Yes, we stand in solidarity with Black Lives Matter, but what does that mean? What do we do that helps their cause? What do we have to learn? What do we need to do better? How do we speak up without our words being empty?

I must also acknowledge that as an aspiring 501(c)(3) we have to be careful about what we say: it is illegal for this kind of organization to speak out politically. We are not permitted to advocate for legislative measures or politicians that support Black Lives Matter’s agendas as that crosses into political territory. That being said, Black Lives Matter itself and the movement around it is not a political statement – it’s about people, equity, and justice.


By Rebeccah Landerholm

 

 

© THE LANDERHOLMSTEAD, 2020

Easy Caramelized Turnips (3 Ingredients!)

I fell in love with turnips when we tried our first CSA: I would never have purchased or cooked them otherwise, but now they are a delicious and inexpensive family favorite! I find they shine best with minimal flavoring and hard/hot cooking. Don’t cut the tops off – that’s an important and scrumptious part of this easy recipe. ~ Rebeccah

3-Ingredient Caramelized Turnips

(Vegan, Gluten Free Option)
Time: 10-20 Minutes                      Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • One Bundle Turnips (greens on)
  • 1 tsp Coconut Oil
  • Soy Sauce (or Tamari for Gluten Free)

Instructions:

  • Preheat a well-seasoned cast iron skillet on medium-high heat (non-stick is less ideal but will work). Add coconut oil and swirl to coat.
  • Chop some of the greens off of the turnips, leaving about 3-4 inches attached to the root
  • Halve the turnips (if you have really large ones, quarter them)
  • Place them cut-side-down in the hot cast iron. Press each lightly with a fork for a few seconds to ensure a good sear. Sprinkle with salt.
  • Cook 5-15 minutes (depending on the size), flipping once, until just barely fork tender. Lower the heat to medium if they are burning or splash a little water in the pan.
  • Remove from heat and drizzle with soy sauce (or Tamari). Shimmy pan to coat well.
  • Serve!

Feel free to comment if you try this recipe – let us know what you think.


By Rebeccah Landerholm

 

 

 

 

 

© THE LANDERHOLMSTEAD, 2020

Welcome our New Treasurer!

We are pleased to announce that we are welcoming a new Treasurer to the Board: Mathew Martello. Learn about the entire Board of Directors here.

Mathew Martello, BS (Treasurer of the Board)

Matt lives in the Norristown, PA area. He graduated from Kutztown University in 2013 with a B.S. in Biology: Molecular/Micro/Cell and two Minors in Math and Biochemistry. Matt works as a Scientist testing Varicella Vaccines for Merck in West Point, PA. He loves math and science and tries to apply them in his everyday life. “There are so many amazing things that I enjoy in this world because of the science and math behind them.” In Matt’s free time he likes to exercise, travel, read, bartend, give back to the community, spend time with friends/family, and play chess. Matt was voted in to the Board during our Q2 meeting April 22, 2020, and he will be inducted at our Q3 meeting July 15, 2020.

Welcome Mathew!

While we have no open positions at the moment, Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Please Apply Online or Contact Us for more information.


© THE LANDERHOLMSTEAD, 2020

Canned Food Recipe ~ Chipotle Pumpkin Soup

This post contains Affiliate Links.

Some of you are recently quarantined due to the coronavirus, others have been isolated for weeks. You may be running out of food ideas or getting bored of the same familiar recipes from your dwindling pantry supply: we’re here to help! While COVID-19 is serious and changing every aspect of our lives, it is also bringing a handful of silver linings, like more people being permitted to work from home. For me, this means a few more hours a day to do the things I enjoy, including cooking and writing.

This particular recipe for Chipotle Pumpkin & Coconut Soup takes mere minutes to prepare while being incredibly tasty and nutritious. And if you’re like me, you always have a can or two of pureed pumpkin lingering around, no matter the season.

I hope you enjoy this recipe and the others I will churn out while practicing social distancing. I hope you are well and that you stay well. I hope this recipe nourishes your body and soul. ~ Rebeccah

Spicy Chipotle Pumpkin Soup

(Vegan and from Canned Ingredients)
Time: 10 minutes                   Serves 4

Ingredients:

Topping Ideas:

  • Greek Yogurt or Sour Cream (to balance the spice)
  • Sesame Oil (or Olive Oil)
  • Sesame Seeds
  • Fresh Rosemary (or any herb! The original recipe called for Green Onions)
  • Croutons for some crunch

Instructions: Ready for this easiness??

  • Add all ingredients (besides toppings) to a blender and blend until smooth
  • Scrape into pot and heat until warmed through
  • Serve with toppings and/or crunchy bread!

Inspired by and Adapted from Rachael Ray Mag’s Pumpkin Soup with Coconut & Curry

Note: Her recipe sounds exceptional! We didn’t have red curry paste at home, hence the adaptation to chipotle. Try one or the other depending on what you have handy.


By Rebeccah Landerholm

© THE LANDERHOLMSTEAD, 2020

Happy 3rd Birthday, Landerholmstead!

Our fledgling nonprofit turned 3 this month. WOW – where has the time gone?! Can we even call it a “fledgling” anymore…? It feels surreal to reflect on all that we have accomplished in our 3 short years, and even more to dream about the (hopefully many) years to come.

In the nonprofit world, of course, things move slowly. These first few years have been essential for establishing our infrastructure, and with much of this work done we are now able to focus significantly more energy on serving the homeless and making moves towards establishing our homestead.

Here are some highlights of our greatest accomplishments during our first years:

And, equally importantly, here are some important goals we hope to accomplish in the upcoming years:

It brings me comfort and pride to consider how methodically and responsibly we have run ourselves thus far, and I look forward to leading this organization into an exciting new chapter in our development.

Happy 3 Years to my fellow Landerholmstead volunteers, supporters, and beneficiaries! Thank you for your donated time and funds, encouragement, and – above all – for your strong belief in our Mission.


By Rebeccah Landerholm

© THE LANDERHOLMSTEAD, 2019

How Botanical Sexism Agitates Your Allergies

By Elizabeth Crews

This post contains Affiliate Links.

Introduction

After years of his wife suffering with severe allergies and asthma, Thomas Leo Ogren was determined to find a solution to suppress her symptoms. What began as a singular journey to help his wife transformed into decades of research that established him as an allergy expert and the author of the most comprehensive botanical allergy books in existence. He realized that the number of individuals with allergies was increasing exponentially, although one of the causes for this suffering is simple: botanical sexism.

Male v. Female Plants in Landscaping

In The Allergy-Fighting Garden, Ogren discusses the reproduction of plants and trees, focusing specifically on those that are dioecious. These plants have distinct male or female reproductive systems. The males produce pollen, which travels  to the females to create seeds and fruit.

Male plants are most often used by cities and homeowners because they do not produce seeds or fruit like the females. Because of this, females are considered to be high-maintenance and require more upkeep, whereas the males are considered easier to manage. This practice is called botanical sexism.

Issues with Botanical Sexism

Ogren maintains that the best treatment for allergies is avoidance. There are medications and inhalers we can use when we experience reactions; however, he states that intentional planting  is the key to decreasing reactions. The males are designed to create pollen and they will continue to send the highly-adhesive particles into the air. If there are no females there to accept the pollen, it seeks another tall surface to adhere to: often people . Breathing in these sticky particles  causes trouble for those with asthma, allergies, and compromised respiratory systems. While planting male trees is often perceived as lower maintenance, the lowest-maintenance option is actually to plant females alone: they do not produce the same high rates of irritants, and without pollination they cannot produce messy seeds and fruit.

That being said, there are benefits to planting males and females together for sexual reproduction. The singular incorporation of male plants and trees has decreased  biodiversity, which increases vulnerability to diseases like the Dutch Elm Disease. It was introduced in 1930s and laid waste to male American elm trees, which were commonly used for their shade. Their close proximity allowed the disease to easily spread from one elm to the next until they were all but completely wiped out. The impressive American elm population never recovered from that devastation.

Governments have also planted male clonal trees. Groups of asexual clonal trees or plants are called colonies, and they are genetically identical and connected by the same root system. As a colony asexually reproduces, single cells multiply to create more, and mutations can occur at a higher rate than during sexual reproduction.

In a study of famous clonal aspen trees nicknamed Pando, botanists have noted that the trees’ sexual fitness decreases with age, meaning the trees do not reproduce as rapidly. If dangerous mutations occur and are asexually produced rapidly, the organism runs the risk of continuing to produce mutated cells, which make them even more vulnerable to diseases like the Dutch Elm Disease.

OPALS: The Solution

To help people plan the most allergy-friendly gardens and landscapes, Ogren developed the OPALS system. The acronym stands for the Ogren Plant Allergy Scale and it details the least to most allergenic plants in an easy-to-read scale of 1-10. It is currently the most comprehensive guide and it was met with such high esteem that branches of the USDA have incorporated it into their landscaping. In addition to landscaping with low-OPALS-rated plants, planting females to receive male pollen (especially in public spaces) will dramatically decrease human exposure to allergens. This book and the rest of Ogren’s work have made it possible to easily create a garden that is allergy friendly.

To learn more about how you can apply this to your own home or homestead, we recommend purchasing Ogren’s book! Using this link to Amazon doesn’t cost you anything, but we are paid a percentage of Amazon’s profit from your purchase!


© THE LANDERHOLMSTEAD, 2018

Finalized 2018 Board of Directors

We recently inducted our final additions to the 2018 Board: Amelia Herbst and Nick Griffin. Learn about the entire Board of Directors here.

Amelia Herbst, MS, BS (General Board Member)

Amelia Herbst is a clinical psychology doctoral student living in Pennsylvania. Her work and research focuses on adolescent therapy, interpersonal violence, crisis intervention, and community mental health. She uses her work to advocate for mental health needs at the local and state levels. In Amelia’s free time, she enjoys podcasts, gaming, and spending time with friends and family. She was inducted to the Board in May 2018.

Nick Griffin, BA (Director of Membership)

Nick currently lives in Seattle, WA. After leaving active duty in the U.S. Marines in 2009, he studied Sociology at Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA. He believes holistic approaches at the community level are key to solving much larger issues. Nick works as a Global Security and Intelligence professional and in his free time enjoys being in nature as much as possible. Nick was inducted into the board in May 2018.

In addition to welcoming Amelia and Nick to the Board, Oliver Smith (a Founder) voluntarily resigned from the Board to prevent any actual or implied conflict-of-interest with his wife, Rebeccah Landerholm, who is President of the Board. We are grateful for his contributions to our Incorporation and establishment, and he will continue to serve as an Officer and Manager of the corporation.

Welcome Amelia and Nick!

While we have no open positions at the moment, Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Please Apply Online or Contact Us for more information.


© THE LANDERHOLMSTEAD, 2018